6/2/10

Clothing & Canada

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Designer behind Canadian Clothing Dace had an interview.. I read it and found many similarities in the struggles and processes... enjoy...


check it out... via Dace’s Fall 2009

Killahbeez: How did you get into fashion?

Dace Moore: My mom used to sew clothes for us which I actually hated because back then I liked the name brand clothes. Then I took sewing in school and when I had a daughter I bought my first sewing machine and started sewing at home. I would buy vintage patterns, make things, and then sell them at consignment stores. Before I went to design school I sold pieces at two or three different studios in Gastown and I had also put on fashion shows. When I was about 25 I went to design school.

KB: What made you want to go to design school?

DM: I wanted to learn pattern drafting. I was always into art and drawing so manipulating patterns was fairly easy for me but I wanted to learn how to do it properly. My main goal was just to do pattern drafting. I had taken a tailoring course as well. When I went to go talk to the school, because I had already been doing so much, they gave me a scholarship so I took the whole course instead of doing just pattern drafting.

KB: The fashion world is known for being hard to survive in, have you ever wanted to throw the towel in and doing something else?

DM: Yes. I don’t know what I’d do but there are times, definitely. I find that when it’s harder I usually just work harder. I think to myself, “I have to get through this”.

KB: Yeah you can’t just sit and wait for the storm to pass, you have to adapt yourself to the situation.

DM: Yeah exactly!

KB: What would you say is the hardest part of working in fashion?

DM: A lot of the business side of things. The cash flow and budgeting, that side is the hardest for me. Starting new seasons is always hard to do because you just worked so hard on one season and just the thought of having to start another one is probably one of the hardest parts of designing a collection.

KB: What’s the most important thing you’ve learned as an entrepreneur?

DM: There’s been a lot! In the beginning more of the production stuff and patterns. It was good making mistakes at that level, in the first year or two. We never had investors or a lot of money so we grew very slowly which was good for us because it gave us time to make and learn from those mistakes.

KB: Had you not pursued fashion, what do you think you’d be doing?

DM: Before I got into fashion I wanted to go into social work. I wanted to work with people. I grew up with an alcoholic father so I always felt the need to help people, like counselling. So many people told me not to do it because it was such a hard job on an emotional level.

KB: Do you see yourself sticking to fashion or expanding to other collections, accessories, etc?

DM: Yes! I like making all sorts of things. I’m working on this crazy quilt from all my old fabrics and it’s been almost a two year process because there’s over 7000 pieces.

We also started making duvets and pillow cases with extra fabric and we sell them on our website. They’re sold out right now but we’ll be making another batch and hopefully they’ll be up in the next month or so.

We also make things, out of leftover fabrics as well, for our customers who order online. We make scarves, handkerchiefs, and little bags that hold their orders.

KB: What’s the creative process like for you guys?

DM: The hardest part is starting the new collection. I go into it not knowing what I want to do and I just start ordering fabrics and then it comes together.

KB: So what can people expect from your Fall 2009 line?

DM: It was shot in Southlands. It has a very equestrian feel to it. The collection is much more fitted and has a lot of silks; it’s a little more dressy than the season before. It kind of has the 1930’s equestrian look and feel.

KB: What do you think the biggest trends will be this fall?

DM: I think more separates like blouses tucked into pants or skirts, etc.

KB: Is there a trend that makes you cringe?

DM: Hmmm….I guess still the UGG boot thing. I’m always surprised when I still see people wearing them. That’s all I can think of that irks me right now.

KB: It seems like people either love UGGs or hate them. No one’s indifferent about UGG boots!

DM: I mean I can understand if you’re wearing them up in the snow but with short shorts and a tank top? I don’t get it.

KB: Are you working on Winter 2010 or Spring 2010 right now? And what can people expect?

DM: Spring 2010. The fabrics are probably one of my favourites ever. It’s very light and airy. All of the fabrics have a vintage feel to them. Lots of creams and we even got a special print made in Italy. It’s definitely my favourite collection so far.

KB: Is there anyone, a celebrity or any other famous person, that inspires you or that you’d like to work with or have as a muse?

DM: Our newest photo shoot is a bit of a tribute to the French Francoise Hardy from the 1960’s to 70’s. She was an everyday girl with such great style.

KB: Do you draw inspiration from other eras?

DM: Yeah we did a collection two years ago that was very Victorian. We go through different periods and they definitely have a huge influence.

KB: Do you have any other inspirations?

DM: Mostly fabric and I love people watching when I’m away traveling. I love watching how people wear things differently. It all of a sudden triggers things and you think, wow that looks cool.

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